Category Archives: Travel in Scotland

Meet Steve Grozier: Americana Artist From Glasgow

Steve Grozier is a singer-songwriter and musician from Glasgow, Scotland. Scottish though he may be, his sound is at home in America, with acoustic, alt-country instrumentals to back his warm, buttery voice. His songs settle over you like the southern heat of a Tennessee summer night.

Steve, who sings and plays acoustic guitar, is his band’s frontman. He wrote all of the music and lyrics of their debut EP, “Take My Leave.” Roscoe Wilson sings backing vocals and plays acoustic guitar, electric guitar, and the lap steel guitar, while John Dunlop plays the bass. Dillon Haldane played drums and percussion the EP, but left the band shortly after, and Pete Colquhoun is now the bands drummer.

Steve and his band recorded their country-tinged debut EP “Take My Leave” in September 2016, and are currently busy recording the follow up EP “A Place We Called Home.”

In one of the tracks from their debut EP, “Drink Before Dawn,” Steve describes stopping for a cup of diner coffee to stay awake while he’s on the road. Listening to the country ballad, you can picture the open highway stretching before your headlights. Although this experience is not unique to American drivers, it is a theme that crops up time and again in Americana.

“Ringing of the Bells” is another track from the debut EP that really invokes a Southern feeling. What with the singer’s slight twang, and his use of small-town imagery, you might have just happened upon Steve in a Nashville bar.

We wanted to learn more about the man behind the music! In our interview with Steve, below, we learned just what it was that drew him to Americana, and inspired his country sound and imagery.


First, could you tell us a bit about where you’re from and how you started getting into music?

I was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. I was only there for a few years before my family moved to Bishopbriggs, a small suburb with a population of around 20,000, just north of Glasgow, Scotland. I lived there until I was 18 and old enough to move to the city for University.

The house I grew up in was filled with music. My dad had a vinyl and cassette deck that was always on. And, when we’d take rides in the car on weekends or school holidays there was always music playing. I remember thinking even then that music was this magical thing.

Then when I was around 15 or 16 I found my dad’s semi-acoustic guitar. A cheap Encore. It was horrible to play. The action was so high and it sounded dreadful. But, it was the first guitar I’d ever held and that was it. I knew I had to learn to play.

What about your band, how did you get together? Are you all Scots?

Yes, we’re all Scots. We’re all from the country’s central belt. I actually met both Roscoe and Pete via the internet. And I met John via Roscoe. I’ve known Roscoe for over ten years. When I was starting to play open mic nights and gigs in bars I placed an advert on Myspace or Gumtree, I can’t recall which, looking for a pedal steel player. Now, the chances of finding someone who can play that instrument well in Scotland are pretty rare, especially back then. Roscoe could and we’ve been friends ever since.  

When 2016 rolled around and I was looking to put a new band together Roscoe was first on my list to call. He was playing with a band and John was the bass player. I put a post-up on Facebook looking for a drummer and Pete got in touch. The rest as they say is history.   

Because we’re an organization that serves as a bridge between Scotland and the US, the fact that you’re a Scottish Americana artist is something we really love! What does Americana mean to you?

I think the term Americana is a relatively new one. When I first started writing and playing it didn’t exist, or it wasn’t widely used. They’d call the style of music folk, country or alternative country. The AMA defines Americana as contemporary music that incorporates elements of American roots music styles. For me, it isn’t a conscious decision to write in a particular style and I’m not that interested in what label is used. I think where the term Americana is useful is in fostering a sense of community and helping bringing attention or exposure to independent artists.     

American music obviously inspires your work! Who are some artists that inspire you? Any Scottish artists?

Unsurprisingly, I listen to a lot of American music. Growing up my dad had records by Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Byrds, The Grateful Dead, Creedence, and a lot of acoustic blues. So, I was immersed in American music and culture from a young age. When I got around to buying and exploring records for myself I gravitated towards artists and bands that sounded like those I’d heard at home.  

I mean, I listen to music from across the spectrum. The colour of the music isn’t as important as how it speaks to me or makes me feel. The music from Scotland that interests me the most are bands like Teenage Fanclub, Arab Strap, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Mogwai, and The Vaselines.   

A lot of Americana music has themes of travel and wayfaring- would you say that plays a part in your music?

Absolutely, I lived and travelled around Canada and the US for two years. One year on the east coast and one on the west. During that period I wrote a lot. Books full of prose, poetry and songs. Most of which will never be published or recorded. I was always interested in the writings of Jack Kerouac and the peripatetic lifestyle that he describes.  When you’re travelling it’s a different way to be in the world. I think one of the reasons I’m drawn to Americana music is because the songs are often narrative driven. They’re stories that take you on a journey to a different place or time.  

What do you think about what music means for American-Scottish relations- or just in terms of connecting people in general?

For me, my closest friendships have been formed through music. Be that playing in a band, going to shows, listening and discussing records. I think a shared passion for music can really enrich a relationship. There’s this great Hold Steady song called Stay Positive and it’s about music’s power to bring people together. The make the analogy of music being like religion when they sing “And the sing along songs will be our scriptures.”

Then there’s this great lineage of Scots and Irish who settled in the Canadian North East, the Appalachians and even North Carolina and Alabama in the 18th century. The Celtic folk songs from Scotland and Ireland would form the basis of what we now call bluegrass, country and Americana music. An interesting thing is now happening in the UK where we’re seeing British artists finding inspiration in American country music.

Do you hope to bring your music to the states?

I would love to. I don’t see it happening in the foreseeable future, but it’s definitely a longer term ambition.    

Spot These 10 Cute Creatures in Scotland

Scotland is famous for its dynamic landscape, which serves as home to many different creatures. If you are interested in seeing wildlife, Scotland is the perfect place to visit! All sorts of different animals roam Scotland’s hills and fields, while various species of birds take flight through the skies, and sea-creatures dance through the waves!

The American-Scottish Foundation has compiled a list of ten different Scottish creatures to spot in Scotland. Keep your eyes peeled for these wee beasties!

Image via bbc.co.uk

Image via bbc.co.uk

1. Scottish Wildcat

The Scottish Wildcat is the only wild, native forest cat in Britain. These cats are very elusive, hunting during the night and hiding among trees and rocky cairns. Although it is uncommon to see one of these majestic cats, they may be spotted in the Highlands and in the far North and West of Scotland. Scottish wildcats are now one of Britain’s rarest mammals, as their species is sadly endangered. Spotting one would truly be a magical experience.


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Image via pinterest.com

2. Highland Cow

Highland cattle are a Scottish cattle breed famous for their long horns and shaggy coats. Although these coats come in many colors, red highland cows are probably the most iconic. These cows originated in the Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland, and have been around since before the 6th century AD. As they are native to the rough Highlands of Scotland, these cows are sturdy, able to withstand the harsh Scottish winters. No trip to the Highlands is complete without a glance of one of these shaggy “coos.”


Image via markcauntphotography.com

Image via markcauntphotography.com

3. Pine Marten

Pine Martens are difficult to spot, and are mostly found in the North of Britain. They tend to live in wooded areas, as they climb and live in trees. These brown and yellow critters are part of the weasel family. They are about the size of a cat, with a long, bushy tail and round ears. They are protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act to preserve the species. They may be found throughout wooded areas in Scotland, including the Ballachuan Hazelwood and Balnaguard Glen Reserves.


Image via mortongolf.com

Image via mortongolf.com

4. Bottlenose Dolphin

Out of all the Bottlenose Dolphins in the world, Scottish ones are the largest. There is a large resident group of these beautiful mammals in the North Sea, as well as smaller groups around the Hebrides. These sleek, grey animals are extremely intelligent, powerful creatures. The Moray Firth is one of the best places to look for them, particularly in the warmer summer months. Dolphin and Wildlife Watching boat trips are easy to find in Scotland, so don’t miss out!


5. Otter

Image via bbc.co.uk

Image via bbc.co.uk

Scottish otters are often hard to spot, even though there is a thriving population. This is due to the animal’s shy nature. These semi-aquatic creatures live by water, as they mainly hunt for food in lochs, rivers, or the sea. The thick-furred mammals are able to survive in water by closing their ears and nose while they swim with their powerful webbed feet. Otters may be found along much of Scotland’s coast, particularly on the west coast, as well as the islands. Although otters are elusive, if you keep a look out by the waterside, you may see more than one!


Image via photoscotland.net

Image via photoscotland.net

6. Red Squirrel

The red squirrel is the only species of squirrel native to the UK. Scotland is the home to about 80 percent of the UK’s population. As their name would suggest, these squirrels have bright, reddish coats of fur. They are smaller and sleeker than American grey squirrels, with large tufts of fur on their ears. They may be spotted throughout Scotland’s wooded areas, but they are most likely to be seen in the Highlands and around the Caingorms. If you are determined to see these iconic Scottish critters, there is a Red Squirrel Walk through Dalbeattie Forest in Dumfries & Galloway.


7. Golden Eagle

Image via wild-scotland.org.uk

Image via wild-scotland.org.uk

The magnificent golden eagle is a large bird of prey with a wingspan of over six feet. The majority of the UK’s golden eagle population lives in Scotland, as the birds prefer to live in areas with open, treeless land. Golden eagles can be recognized by the golden plumage on their head, neck and shoulders. Scotland’s landscape is ideal for golden eagles to hunt, and you just might spot one searching for prey over moorland and peat bogs, or swooping over the open land around the Highlands and Northern Isles. 


Image via dailymail.co.uk

Image via dailymail.co.uk

8. Atlantic Grey Seal

Atlantic grey seals are one of the easiest animals to find in Scotland. You may spot groups of these seals in many places along Scotland’s coast. The biggest grey seal colonies are on remote islands such as the Orkney and Shetland Islands, the Hebrides, and the Monach Isles. The seals go to these islands to breed, but outside of breeding season you may see them lounging on beaches and rocks all along the sea. If you are visiting the Scottish seaside on your trip you are likely to spot a seal. And if you’re really lucky you may even see a fluffy seal pup!


Image via urdutehzeb.com

Image via urdutehzeb.com

9. Shetland Pony

Shetland ponies might be small in size, but they are hugely famous! These charming ponies grow to be about 42 inches tall, and their soft coats come in many different colors. Their coats change by season- in the summer their coat is short and silky, while in the winter it grows twice as thick. These thick winter coats repel water and keep the ponies warm, even in the harsh island winters. You can still see herds of these sturdy little ponies roaming the hills of Shetland, where they have lived for over 4000 years. Visit Shetland to meet some of these adorable creatures!


Image via archies.info

Image via archies.info

10. Puffin

Puffins, often referred to as “the clowns of the coast,” are instantly recognizable by their bright bills and signature waddle. Puffins live by the sea, usually in burrows on the top of cliffs. They hunt for fish in the water, diving from the cliffs and swimming beneath the waves. Puffin nests can be found on cliffs and islands around the coast of Scotland, as well as in England and Wales. The best places to see these funny little seabirds in Scotland are Handa Island, the Isle of Eigg, and the Longhaven Cliffs and the Seaton Cliffs reserves.

Show off your Clan Pride at the 2017 Tattoo!

This year is Scotland’s ‘Year of Heritage, History and Archaeology, and the 2017 Tattoo is embracing this theme by featuring the Clans and Families of Scotland!

unnamedThe Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, which takes place August 4 – 27, has just announced the clans which will be appearing as part of this year’s show, which is themed “Splash of Tartan.” The Tattoo and the Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs have joined together to involve Scottish Clans and Families. Clan Chiefs have been invited to lead their clansmen to Edinburgh Castle, on their own special designated evenings, and to take part in the opening ceremony! Do you want to represent your clan at this year’s Tattoo? For a limited time only, visitors looking to book tickets to sit in their designated clans seated section can contact their Clan Chief directly! You can find out more details about your clan and chief at www.clanchiefs.org.uk or by emailing info@clanchiefs.org.uk. This promotion will end on 31st March, so act fast!unnamed-2

Whether you have Clan roots or not, if you plan to attend the Tattoo, you are encouraged to dress for the part! Put on your best tartan and tweed! Come August, Edinburgh is sure to be a wonderland of plaid!

Find your Clan’s date and time below, and purchase tickets for the Tattoo here.

Day

Date

Time

Clan/Family

Thursday

3 August

9.30

Macnab and Hay

Friday

4 August

9.00

Arthur and Murray

Saturday

5 August

7.30

Fraser and Gunn

Saturday

5 August

10.30

Hunter, Macdonald and MacKay

Monday

7 August

9.00

Macauley and MacMillan

Tuesday

8 August

9.00

Ewing and Macpherson

Wednesday

9 August

9.00

Broun, Maclean and Wood

Thursday

10 August

9.00

Henderson and Napier

Friday

11 August

9.00

Leslie, Moffat and Urquhart

Saturday

12 August

7.30

Donnachaidh and Oliphant

Saturday

12 August

10.30

Macneil, Macrae and Marjoribanks

Monday

14 August

9.00

Forbes and Wallace

Tuesday

15 August

9.00

Macleod and Mackenzie

Wednesday

16 August

9.00

Campbell and Sinclair

Thursday

17 August

9.00

Borthwick and Skene

Friday

18 August

9.00

Graham and Stewart

Saturday

19 August

7.30

Colquhoun and Matheson

Saturday

19 August

10.30

Currie and Maclea

Monday

21 August

9.00

Buchanan, Hannay and MacGregor

Tuesday

22 August

9.00

Kincaid and Maclaine

Wednesday

23 August

9.00

Agnew and Elliot

Thursday

24 August

9.00

Carmichael and MacThomas

Friday

25 August

9.00

Bruce and Durie

Saturday

26 August

7.30

Jardine, Macintyre and Maclennan

Saturday

26 August

10.30

Cameron, Clan Ranald and Maclaren

 

 

Vallay & North Uist Archaeology Climate Change Project.

In this the Year of Archaeology for Scotland, the American-Scottish Foundation shares with our Members an opportunity to help support the work of June Julian and her husband Rodrick B. MacLennan – and their Vallay & North Uist Archaeology Climate Change Project. 

Through the sale of these beautiful watercolor limited edition prints, you will help the funding of the next phase of the project – a second season of archaeology field work in Vallay & North Uist in Summer 2017, as well as helping support the  work of the ASF.

These limited edition prints, 10×8″ on a 14×11″ mat in vinyl sleeve, are $145 each, plus $10 shipping & handling; a portion of proceeds goes to ASF.    $45 per print is tax deductible. The American-Scottish Foundation® is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

“Sea Pinks, Vallay” “Atlantic Coast, Vallay”
 
 
“Vallay Strand, Ebb Tide” “North Uist from Vallay”
 
 

©June Julian, Limited Edition Archival Giclée Prints. Signed and Numbered, 2017

MacLennan-Julian-FlagActual_250The Isle of Vallay Archaeology/Climate Change Expedition: An Explorers Club Flag Expedition 2017.                                                                           Rodrick B. MacLennan, FN 98, carried Explorers Club Flag #109 on an expedition to the wild and uninhabited island of Vallay in the North Atlantic to record the effects of rising seas and violent storms on endangered coastal archaeology sites. Since 1918, the flag has been carried on hundreds of expeditions: to outer space, to both Poles, to the deepest ocean, and to the highest peaks in the world.

The continuing objective of their Isle of Vallay Archaeology Climate Change Expedition is to record the current status of those early Mesolithic sites first discovered on the Isles of Vallay and North Uist by 19th century archaeologist Erskine Beveridge as impacted by climate change.

Read more

A hidden gem in Glasgow’s West End – Ashton Lane.

Anyone traveling to Glasgow, United Kingdom in the coming months?

Ashton LaneIf so you should check out Ashton Lane. A hidden gem located in Glasgow’s West End, A Cobblestone street lined with bars, restaurants and entertainment great for a chilled out lunch with friends and a lively evening scene.

VisitScotland launch a new updated Outlander Location Map

Did you love the Outlander Location Map VisitScotland did last year?  The American-Scottish Foundation® loved it – GREAT NEWS – there is a new updated Location Map.

OUTLANDER FILM LOCATIONSSo are you a fan of the books and TV series and wish that you too could be transported in time – to Claire and Jamie’s Scotland?

Now experience the land that inspired the dramatic saga!

Here are our two recommendations!
- Head to the VisitScotland.com website to learn more about Outander’s Scotland! The website features a guide to the history, culture, and backdrop behind the fictional series!gLENCOE

- VisitScotland offer up a guide to exploring Scotland the Outlander way!

- In addition to the new location map- ready for you to download – which features the Outlander film locations from both Seasons 1 and 2! Use this map to embark on your very own Outlander tour!

sTANDING STONES

This Outlander tour features locations such as Glencoe, HighlandGeorge Squarer, Blackness CastleGlasgow Cathedral Drummond Castlel, Falkland, FifeCulross Fife,, and more.

You can learn more about your ancestry (perhaps you’re a Fraser), attempt to time-travel at historic standing stones, tour dramatic castles,

and wander through the breathtaking Scottish landscapes!

Download the map today, and start planning your tour of Outlander’s Scotland:

Enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner In Scotland

pilgrimsAre you in Scotland and wondering where you can enjoy a great Thanksgiving – with Turkey, pecan or pumpkin pie?  Do not despair – you can still enjoy Thanksgiving food!

This time of year, many Scottish restaurants have festive menus that feature full turkey dinners. If it’s not turkey you’re after, but just a bit of classic American grub (hot dogs anyone?), there are plenty of American-style eateries in Scotland’s cities as well.

But with Scotland’s own unique cuisine and so many phenomenal restaurants to choose from, maybe Haggis could become your new Thanksgiving tradition!

For those of you still craving a classic American feast, we have provided a list of Thanksgiving Dinner options from two of Scotland’s big cities, Edinburgh and Glasgow. So tuck in, enjoy, and be thankful!

Where to go in Edinburgh on Thanksgiving …

 Twenty Princes Street, Edinburgh

21-prince-street-png-masterTwenty Princes Street is an award-winning contemporary Scottish restaurant,  with a Modern Scottish menu, set in a Victorian building with skyline views.

With a festive menu on offer from November 22nd, you can start your Thanksgiving meal with one of the restaurant’s unique appetizers, such as Parsnip soup or Mulled Wine Pear & Lemon Ricotta Tart. Then move on to the main course, Ballotine of Turkey with apricot, cranberry, and sage stuffing, chipolatas in bacon, roast potatoes, glazed potatoes, and port jus.

If you are having Thanksgiving in Scotland it needs to be different .. and this modern twist on a classic holiday meal will surely leave you in the holiday spirit.

See the full menu, here.

The Three Sisters, 139 Cowgate, Edinburgh

The Three Sisters is a cozy pub with a casual atmosphere, and usually a lively crowd that spills out into the outdoor courtyard.

With sports games playing throughout the day, and drinks specials to draw in a crowd in the evening, you can celebrate Thanksgiving all day and night!

For Thanksgiving 2016, The Three Sisters is hosting a special event in which they’re serving up a roast turkey dinner, complete with mashed and roast potatoes, peas, and corn on the cob. Rather than pumpkin pie, they’ll be slicing up blueberry cheesecake.

With turkey to eat, beer to drink, and American football on the screen, you might just forget that you’re not in the States!

Find out more, here.

Frontier  8 Gillespie Pl, Edinburgh

Although a full turkey dinner is not on the menu, “Native New Yorker” hot dogs, “Frontier Classic Nachos”, and “The Great American Mac & Cheese” are. They also serve American beers like Sam Adams, so you can wet your whistle American-style.

So enjoy a taste of the USA this Thanksgiving, even while you are so far from home! And if you try out the “Great American Pie of the Day”, it might just feel like a traditional Thanksgiving after all!

Read the menu, here.

Where to go in Glasgow on Thanksgiving … 

Ad Lib, 33 Ingram Street, Glasgow

Ad Lib is a cozy and casual US-style diner with two locations in the city, one in the City Centre, and one at Merchant City. The restaurant has an “American Classics” menu that includes dishes like burgers and fried chicken.

If you’re looking to skip Thanksgiving dinner and delve right into dessert, this menu also features two Thanksgiving staples: apple pie, and pecan pie.

However, their seasonal Christmas Menu does include a turkey dinner, so you can enjoy a full Thanksgiving feast. The dish is a turkey breast glazed with maple and chilli, and served with thyme gravy and all the trimmings. So if you want a casual Thanksgiving complete with turkey, pie, and a classic diner vibe, Ad Lib is the perfect destination. 

Have a look at the menus, here.

The Bothy Restaurant. 11 Ruthven Ln, Glasgow

The Bothy is a warm, welcoming restaurant in the West End of Glasgow that cooks up traditional Scottish dishes served by friendly, kilted staff. Although the restaurant serves Scottish cuisine, their festive menu features a unique – great – turkey dinner – with a Scottish twist!

The turkey is served with date and apple stuffing, pork chipolatas, and cranberry jus. Finish off your meal with a traditional Christmas pudding, or a decadent chocolate truffle cake. With an extensive wine and drinks menu, pick your poison and propose a toast to celebrating the USA in Scotland.

Read the menu, here.

TriBeCa, Glasgow - four locations to choose from ..

TriBeCa is a casual NYC inspired restaurant and bar that is decorated with hanging lights and posters of New York. The restaurant is instantly recognizable by the NYPD Cruiser and NYC Cab parked outside.

Rated highly for its brunch, TriBeCa is a great stop if you’d like to celebrate Thanksgiving with a big, New York style breakfast. The brunch menu features American-style pancakes and bacon, french toast, breakfast burritos, and more. Order a side home fries or pulled pork, and drink plenty of their bottomless coffee to wash it all down. At this rate, you’ll probably be stuffed until Christmas.

If Thanksgiving brunch wont cut it for you, TriBeCa will also be serving up a set menu on Thanksgiving, so you can spend your evening digging into a real turkey feast.

Have a look at the menus, here.
AND to one and all we wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving.

The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways, in association with the American-Scottish Foundation, offers you a way to become involved and support the vision of the Scottish Waterways Trust


As a Member and Friend of the American-Scottish Foundation, we are sharing with you the premiere issue of The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways e-news!

The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways, in association with the American-Scottish Foundation, offers you a way to become involved and support the vision of the Scottish Waterways Trust who are missioned with the valuable work of supporting the protection and conservation of Scotland’s beautiful, unique waterways, from canals to historic properties surrounding the canals.

 

We invite you to enjoy with us, the rich history and exciting future of Scotland’s inland waterways and the people and communities that surround them – along with ways for you to become involved.

Meet the canals 
Scotland’s canals were hugely influential in the industrial and social growth of the country two hundred years ago. The advance of commerce and industry across Scotland increased the need for an efficient inland transport system, and the country’s flair for invention and engineering rose to the challenge.

The ingenuity of our ancestors, left the country with a lasting legacy – five stunning canals, over 137 miles of waterway, all protected as national heritage assets are attracting millions of visitors each year.

 Spotlighting three of Scottish Waterways canals:

The Union Canal (31 miles)’   The Union Canal flows into the heart of Scotland’s capital city, Edinburgh. Conceived as a direct route for the people of Edinburgh to access cheap sources of coal from the West, the canal literally fueled the country’s industrial revolution.


After only 4 years of construction, the canal opened in 1822.

The Forth & Clyde Canal (35 miles)   Running through Scotland’s biggest city, Glasgow, the Forth & Clyde Canal was the world’s first man-made sea-to-sea canal, and the biggest single construction venture undertaken in Scotland at the time.

By the mid 19th century, over 3,000,000 tons of goods and 200,000 passengers a year were traveling on the Forth & Clyde Canal.

Bankside industries included timber and paper mills, glassworks, foundries, breweries and distilleries (including the biggest in the world at the time at Port Dundas).

Today archeological excavation is underway, read more of volunteer help below.

The Crinan Canal (9 miles)   The Crinan Canal, once described as the ‘most beautiful shortcut in the world,’ started as the Duke of Argyll’s canal and stretches from Crinan to Ardrishaig in Scotland’s northeast

Queen Victoria navigated the waterway in 1847, and passenger steamer companies were quick to advertise a ‘Royal Route.’
 
Today you can cruise the Crinan and surrounding waters on a wooden ketch with your own cook and skipper.
_____________________________________ 
Scotland’s Canals Now  
Today, Scotland’s canals are vibrant once again. Communities are enjoying boating on restored waterways, walking and biking along the towpaths, watching wildlife, and learning about their heritage – and sharing a new future.

As a Member of the American Friends of the Scottish Waterways Trust you can enjoy a Members saving on a Cottage stay in a cottage or house along the banks of a Scottish Canal. Just one of the benefits of Membership, a great way to help support the Canals of Scotland.
Of the various ways to support and become an
American Friend of the Scottish Waterways Click Here.
For questions about the various programs please contact:
Camilla Hellman, American-Scottish Foundation, NYC

Glen Coe is one of the highlights of any visit to Scotland – a MUST SEE.

Scotland has many beautiful hills and mountains, but the magical region of Glen Coe is one of the highlights of any visit to Scotland – a MUST SEE.

With hotels from the 5 star Glencoe House, a Victorian mansion with spectacular views and service to taking a self catering cottage (Discover Glencoe, Scotland is a great resource) or camping, the area is breathtaking.

Glencoe valleyThe region includes three famous peaks known as “The Three Sisters” and is a paradise for walkers and climbers in all seasons, and skiers and snowboarders in the winter.

Visitors can also hire mountain bikes and hurtle downhill on the many purpose-built bike tracks. There is so much to do from sailing, white water or sea kayaking, fishing, canyoning, golf, archery, climbing or simply walking the miles of mountain and forestry tracks.

Glencoe Valley 2

There is so much to do from sailing, white water or sea kayaking, fishing, canyoning, golf, archery, climbing or simply walking the miles of mountain and forestry tracks.

Find out more about Glen Coe here on the VisitScotland website:

 

The Scottish State Coach, to be on view from July 30th – August 28th in the forecourt of Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh.

The magnificent Scottish State Coach, will be displayed from July 30th – August 28th in the forecourt of Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh, to mark HM The Queen’s 90th birthday year.

Scottish State CoachThe Coach which was originally called the Cambridge Coach, was built for HRH The Duke of Cambridge in 1830 and used for the coronation of his brother, William IV, the following year.  In 1968     HM The Queen instructed that she wished to have a coach for Scotland.

 The Cambridge coach was remodeled and renamed the Scottish State Coach.

The emblems of the Order of the Thistle, and the Scottish version of the Royal Arms were painted on the sides, and a model of the Crown of Scotland was added to the roof.

Scottish state coach 2As writer and historian, Roddie Martine noted:
“This is Scotland’s very own carriage of state, sleek and impressive, cherished throught the years ….. though not ideally suited to the cobbled streets of the Old Town.”

The coach is normally housed at the The Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace, home to the Royal Collection of historic coaches and carriages, and is usually drawn by four horses.

The Queen first used the Scottish State Coach on 22 May 1969, . The coach has conveyed the Royal Family in the Jubilee Procession, and to the The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh back to Buckingham Palace after the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in 2011