Category Archives: Initiatives

Join us as the ASF presents the Wallace Award to Sir Moir Lockhead & Andy Scott for their contributions to Scottish Heritage, Arts & Culture.

Friday 9th November – New York

The ASF Wallace Awards Celebration

Friday November 9th

University Club, One West 54th Street, New York

The Wallace Awards will be presented to:

Sir Moir Lockhead, Chairman, National Trust for Scotland for a lifetime journey providing transport for people to reach & enjoy Scotland’s beautiful landscapes & his current inspired leadership to conserve Scotland’s rich heritage.

Dr. Andy Scott for his outstanding contribution to Scottish Arts.  Dr Scott is recognized as one of today’s foremost contemporary sculptors, world renowned for his public art.  Amongst his most recognizable works are his 100 foot tall Kelpies, the largest equine sculptures in the world, located in Falkirk, Scotland.

The evening will be a celebration of Scotland with whisky from Glendronach Single Malt Scotch Distillery, Scottish food, music, dancing - and opportunities to bid on our silent and live auctions.

Scotland’s National Chef Gary Maclean, Winner of the UK MasterChef The Professionals 2016, Chef Lecturer at the City of Glasgow College, will bring “touches” to spark the menu.

The award winning team of Claire McKenzie & Scott Gilmour of Noisemaker will offer musical interludes with Mike Ogoltree and Shortbread, and will then lead the Scottish reels.                                                                                                                                                                   Silent and Live Auctions will bring opportunities to help support the ongoing work of the ASF, and an ASF Grant to the new Baird Family Hospital in Aberdeen for its Neo Natal unit overseen by The ARCHIE Foundation alongside the University of Aberdeen.

We hope you will join us for this very special evening.

Tickets may be reserved HERE 

If you wish to join a table we will look to seat you – or let us know whose table you are joining.

If you have questions please call the ASF Office on 212 605 0338

or email americanscottishfoundation@gmail.com

 With Andy Scott joining us on November 9th, how can we not look back to Tartan Week 2014 and the 20 ft macquette Kelpies on display that spring at Bryant Park.

Read more of the 2014 Kelpies stay in New York HERE.

ASF is proud to have helped to bring the Kelpies to New York – we were so sorry to see them leave.

The full size 100 ft Kelpies, unveiled in 2015, are the largest equine sculptures in the world; situated in the Helix Park, Falkirk, beside the Forth of Clyde & River Carron extension.  Boats traverse “through” the Kelpies; and when lit at night they become magnificent beacons.

Glasgow and New York celebrate the 150th Anniversary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh

June 7th marks the 150th Anniversary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh.
At Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum a temporary exhibit is on show through to August 14th showing Mackintosh’s work in the context of Glasgow, his predecessors, influences and contemporaries.

Assistant curator Hannah Willetts stands in front of posters at thttps://content-wordpress.pressassociation.com/wp-admin/edit.php?post_type=advisoryhe launch of Charles Rennie Mackintosh Making the Glasgow Style (Andrew Milligan/PA)The exhibit features work from Glasgow’s civic collections, alongside key loans from Hunterian Museum and Art GalleryThe Glasgow School of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum and a number of private lenders.

As the Daily Mail notes – the exhibit …. “It features more than 250 objects including stained glass, ceramics, mosaic, furniture, textiles, interior and tearoom design and architectural drawings, most of which have not been shown in Glasgow for more than 30 years.”

“The Charles Rennie Mackintosh Making the Glasgow Style exhibition is one of the highlights in the Mackintosh 150 programme, a year long celebration of events throughout 2018.”

decorative artIn New York on June 7th a talk & reception will take place hosted by General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of New York together with The American-Scottish Foundation® & The National Trust for Scotland, on the influence of Mackintosh on New York architecture – presented by John Kinnear, Architect, Historian & Director, and on the power of Mackintosh’s design and threstoration of Hill House.                                                                                                                              To read more about the Scots Who Built New York visit the American-Scottish Foundation project page HERE.                                                                                                                                             For more information surrounding the National Trust for Scotland restoration of Hill House visit the NTS USA project page linked HERE                                                                                                                                                                 Tickets are from $10 for ASF, NTS USA, GSMT, ROS, NYCC and $15 for Guests and Friends and are available directly on line here                                                                                                                    To learn more of the exhibit visit Glasgow Life Museum website and rad the full Daily Mail article linked here

Vallay & North Uist Archaeology Climate Change Project.

In this the Year of Archaeology for Scotland, the American-Scottish Foundation shares with our Members an opportunity to help support the work of June Julian and her husband Rodrick B. MacLennan – and their Vallay & North Uist Archaeology Climate Change Project. 

Through the sale of these beautiful watercolor limited edition prints, you will help the funding of the next phase of the project – a second season of archaeology field work in Vallay & North Uist in Summer 2017, as well as helping support the  work of the ASF.

These limited edition prints, 10×8″ on a 14×11″ mat in vinyl sleeve, are $145 each, plus $10 shipping & handling; a portion of proceeds goes to ASF.    $45 per print is tax deductible. The American-Scottish Foundation® is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.

“Sea Pinks, Vallay” “Atlantic Coast, Vallay”
 
 
“Vallay Strand, Ebb Tide” “North Uist from Vallay”
 
 

©June Julian, Limited Edition Archival Giclée Prints. Signed and Numbered, 2017

MacLennan-Julian-FlagActual_250The Isle of Vallay Archaeology/Climate Change Expedition: An Explorers Club Flag Expedition 2017.                                                                           Rodrick B. MacLennan, FN 98, carried Explorers Club Flag #109 on an expedition to the wild and uninhabited island of Vallay in the North Atlantic to record the effects of rising seas and violent storms on endangered coastal archaeology sites. Since 1918, the flag has been carried on hundreds of expeditions: to outer space, to both Poles, to the deepest ocean, and to the highest peaks in the world.

The continuing objective of their Isle of Vallay Archaeology Climate Change Expedition is to record the current status of those early Mesolithic sites first discovered on the Isles of Vallay and North Uist by 19th century archaeologist Erskine Beveridge as impacted by climate change.

Read more

GIVING TUESDAY, Tuesday November 29th – Become a Member of the American-Scottish Foundation.

giving-tuesday-2

PLEASE SUPPORT The American-Scottish Foundation® on Tuesday November 29th, GivingTuesday

A great way to become involved and support the work of the Foundation is to become a Member in this the 60th Anniversary of the ASF.

http://www.americanscottishfoundation.com/…/indiv_membershi…

Help us to build upon our mission, bridging Scotland and the USA.
Learn more of how you can become involved
http://www.americanscottishfoundation.com/home/index.html

The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways, in association with the American-Scottish Foundation, offers you a way to become involved and support the vision of the Scottish Waterways Trust


As a Member and Friend of the American-Scottish Foundation, we are sharing with you the premiere issue of The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways e-news!

The American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways, in association with the American-Scottish Foundation, offers you a way to become involved and support the vision of the Scottish Waterways Trust who are missioned with the valuable work of supporting the protection and conservation of Scotland’s beautiful, unique waterways, from canals to historic properties surrounding the canals.

 

We invite you to enjoy with us, the rich history and exciting future of Scotland’s inland waterways and the people and communities that surround them – along with ways for you to become involved.

Meet the canals 
Scotland’s canals were hugely influential in the industrial and social growth of the country two hundred years ago. The advance of commerce and industry across Scotland increased the need for an efficient inland transport system, and the country’s flair for invention and engineering rose to the challenge.

The ingenuity of our ancestors, left the country with a lasting legacy – five stunning canals, over 137 miles of waterway, all protected as national heritage assets are attracting millions of visitors each year.

 Spotlighting three of Scottish Waterways canals:

The Union Canal (31 miles)’   The Union Canal flows into the heart of Scotland’s capital city, Edinburgh. Conceived as a direct route for the people of Edinburgh to access cheap sources of coal from the West, the canal literally fueled the country’s industrial revolution.


After only 4 years of construction, the canal opened in 1822.

The Forth & Clyde Canal (35 miles)   Running through Scotland’s biggest city, Glasgow, the Forth & Clyde Canal was the world’s first man-made sea-to-sea canal, and the biggest single construction venture undertaken in Scotland at the time.

By the mid 19th century, over 3,000,000 tons of goods and 200,000 passengers a year were traveling on the Forth & Clyde Canal.

Bankside industries included timber and paper mills, glassworks, foundries, breweries and distilleries (including the biggest in the world at the time at Port Dundas).

Today archeological excavation is underway, read more of volunteer help below.

The Crinan Canal (9 miles)   The Crinan Canal, once described as the ‘most beautiful shortcut in the world,’ started as the Duke of Argyll’s canal and stretches from Crinan to Ardrishaig in Scotland’s northeast

Queen Victoria navigated the waterway in 1847, and passenger steamer companies were quick to advertise a ‘Royal Route.’
 
Today you can cruise the Crinan and surrounding waters on a wooden ketch with your own cook and skipper.
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Scotland’s Canals Now  
Today, Scotland’s canals are vibrant once again. Communities are enjoying boating on restored waterways, walking and biking along the towpaths, watching wildlife, and learning about their heritage – and sharing a new future.

As a Member of the American Friends of the Scottish Waterways Trust you can enjoy a Members saving on a Cottage stay in a cottage or house along the banks of a Scottish Canal. Just one of the benefits of Membership, a great way to help support the Canals of Scotland.
Of the various ways to support and become an
American Friend of the Scottish Waterways Click Here.
For questions about the various programs please contact:
Camilla Hellman, American-Scottish Foundation, NYC

The Scots Who Built New York: A Walking Tour App and Map on the Horizon

The American-Scottish Foundation is proud to have a vibrant and growing platform of Arts and Culture programming, including our contribution to the Landmarks 50+ project.

Through this partnership, the ASF has developed the fascinating history of The Scots Who Built New York’s Landmarks, chronicling the contribution of Scottish Americans to the building of New York.

picture-3Recently, The Times of London published an article on how The American-Scottish Foundation® is embarking on this second phase of The Scots Who Built New York project with the development of an App and A Map. As The Times notes this will be so useful to visitors to the City, and here at the ASF, we are excited and proud to be undertaking this next phase of the project.

With research undertaken by Architect and Architectural historian John Kinnear, The American-Scottish Foundation has developed a photographic series of talks exploring the huge contribution of Scottish-Americans to the building of New York.

To date, the five The Scots Who Built New York lectures have reflected on eras of architecture as exemplified by a leading Scottish architect of the time. Noted within the research and talks are references to other contemporary, leading Scottish American architects.

picture-2Now, the Scots who built New York’s landmarks will literally be put on the map by the newest addition to the project. The Scots who created important buildings like Carnegie Hall and Penn Station will be celebrated by a Walking Tour App, and NYC Map. With our work around this project we will expand our research, noting additional Scottish-American Landmark buildings that were built over the last 350 years.

As ASF’s executive director, Camilla Hellman, explains, the research for the project has taken over 18 months. “Now we are looking to move on to create a city map and walking tour app which will allow visitors to discover the leading buildings that Scottish-Americans have been responsible for,” she said.

picture-8As The Scots Who Built New York project has shown, people are often amazed to learn how much of NYC’s famous skyline is the result of the innovative work of Scottish architects, developers, and engineers. According to Ms Hellman, Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, the author and director of the Historic Landmarks Preservation Centre, said she has now come to realize that “all the leading landmarks in New York appear to have been built by Scots.”

The Scottish diaspora has truly been a part of New York’s fabric since the city’s early days. As John Kinnear notes, “Scottish-Americans and Scottish architects, in particular, have been a leading force in the developing of New York and remain so today. We are now looking to bring this important and fascinating history to a wider audience through the walking tour app and map, and ultimately, a coffee-table book entitled The Scots Who Built New York.”

The forthcoming project will spotlight various locations, like the designs of architect Charles McKim, including the Morgan Library and Museum, and the Morningside Heights campus of Columbia University. The map will also feature Carnegie Hall, which was financed by Scots philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie, and the Empire State Building, which was designed by William Lamb.

Other highlights will include Gracie Mansion, which was originally built for Archibald Gracie of Dumfries, President Ulysses Grant’s mausoleum, which was designed by John Duncan, and St Andrew’s Golf Club, the oldest golf club in the US.

picture-6We are looking to have the App and Map for April 2017, to coincide with the Tartan Week celebrations that will take place in New York City at that time.

Would you like to join us as a Sponsor or Patron of the exciting next phase of this project?

Find out more about The Scots Who Built New York, and how you can support the project on the ASF website, here.

Images via americanscottishfoundation.com.

Now you can become an American Friend of Scottish Canals and Waterways.

The American Friends of Scottish Canals and Waterway now allows you a way to help support, and become involved in the preservation of Scotland’s waterways and canals.

The American-Scottish Foundation® is working with the Scottish Waterways Trust’s on innovative, outdoors projects – caring for the canals and creating brighter futures for people living along their banks.  

American diaspora, and those who just have a love of Scotland, will now be able to donate or take up membership packages through the Trust’s new American Friends of Scotland’s Canals & Waterways [AFSC&W] initiative.

By becoming a Member or donating to a particular project of AFSC&W, the American Friends will help ensure a brighter future for Scotland’s two hundred year old historic canals by making possible a range of important repair and improvement projects.

Two pioneering waterways projects, Canal College 2® and Ironwork Canal Archaeologists are leading initiatives that the American Friends will focus on..Scotland’s first ever Canal College, the Trust’s most successful project to date, helped 116 young people across Scotland into work, further education or training between 2013 and 2015. The charity is now fundraising for the $1.9 million needed to open canal college 2 in North Glasgow, Falkirk and the Highlands and run it for a further three years.

Ironwork Canal Archaeologists is an innovative project designed by Scottish Waterways Trust to uncover the fascinating history of a lost canal-side Ironworks on the Forth & Clyde Canal in Glasgow, with a series of archaeological and heritage events for the local community and general public.

Scottish Waterways Trust uses innovative waterways projects like these to engage those suffering from poor physical and mental health, social isolation and unemployment and help them gain the confidence and skills they need to turn their lives around.

Now donors in America can help make these projects possible and ensure Scottish Waterways Trust can reach and help even more people across the country.

Learn more by visiting our The American Friends of Scottish Canals and Waterways donation page – you can become a Friend or support a student for Canal College.

If you have questions email ASF Office at americanscottishfoundation@gmail.com

Ken P 1

The story behind Ken Pattersons photographic exhibit, “In the Footsteps of John Muir”, currently on show at Federal Hall, Wall Street, New York – through July 8th, 2016.

Daily Record reporter, Paul English, recently spoke to Scottish photographer Ken Patterson of how his current photographic exhibit, “In the Footsteps of John Muir” came together and his journey to seeing it now a part of the Centennial Celebrations at Federal Hall, Wall Street, NYC

As Patterson notes … “All of America’s national park system came out of this determination by Roosevelt to preserve America’s wild places for future generations.

“John Muir had a very strong belief that by going outdoors, you actually went into something. He was quite spiritual, he referred to nature as God’s cathedral.”

_____________________________________

AT THE heart of world finance on Wall Street, Americans are lining up to pay tribute to the Scotsman they regard as a hero for changing their country for the better.

Yet back in his homeland, the name of the man they regard as the father of modern environmentalism remains in relative obscurity.

photography exhibition is being held in Federal Hall, a historic building in the centre of the financial zone, ­celebrating the life and legacy of a man who measured riches in nature’s bounty, not stocks and shares.

Muir was born in Dunbar, East Lothian , in 1838, crossing the Atlantic with his family 11 years later, landing in Wisconsin and growing up to become the father of the US National Park Service, who ­celebrate their ­centenary in August.

Fifer Ken ­Paterson’s exhibition in Manhattan is one among many events planned to mark it.

Ken’s show, In The ­Footsteps of John Muir, features the work of a ­Scottish ­photographer on whose life Muir had a profound and transformative impact many years after his death in 1914.

Ken has had a lifelong enthusiasm for outdoor activities, propelling him into the mountains around the world as a keen walker, rock and ice climber.

But it wasn’t until he was ­recuperating from a brain tumour in 2001 that he encountered the work of Muir, and grew to appreciate the ­restorative power of the Scot’s mantra.

Ken said: “Although I obviously had many difficulties, the experience of the brain tumour ultimately proved to be a positive one. When I got out of the hospital, I had to learn how to walk and obviously I couldn’t climb either.

“My thinking processes were fairly limited in those days. I went on the internet and typed in Yosemite, because it was a world centre of rock climbing, and every time I did that, I kept coming across the name of John Muir


Yosemite valley from tunnel view, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

 “I was staggered when I came to realise I had lived my whole life mainly in Edinburgh, had been passionate about climbing and the outdoors, and yet I hadn’t heard of this guy.

“It made me think, ‘What is wrong with Scotland? Why are we singing songs about Bonnie Prince Charlie rather than John Muir?”

As his rehabilitation progressed, former ­newspaper photographer Ken took a trip to the ­footsteps of the revered conservationist, heading to Yosemite, the vast national park in ­California, in which the seeds of Muir’s legacy were sewn

Enthused by the ­wilderness, Ken found a way to reconnect with nature, a passion represented in the photos of his trip.

And in a bid to draw a connection between the American luminary and his Scottish heritage, Ken approached the American Scottish Foundation, co-organisers of the annual New York Tartan Week celebrations.

The photographs became part of the program of events in the 2005 jamboree, being exhibited in Central Park’s Arsenal Gallery and twice since then, including during Muir’s centenary and again this year.

Dad-of-two Ken, 59, said: “The outdoors played such an important part in my life and, after illness, getting back to that was very important to me.

“It was looking at Muir, reading about what he had done, which ­rekindled my passion and ­determination to get back out there and do it.

“Muir talks about his childhood and the various things he did, climbing on to the roof of his house. I did that when I was young. He got himself stuck at the top of a mountain in a storm and the same thing happened to me in the Alps.”


Photographer Ken Patterson : his photography exhibition In The Footsteps of John Muir opens in New York this month.

Ken’s recovery affirmed a wider pondering on notions of Scottish identity, at home and abroad, and eventually led to him establishing a website, The Famous Scots Project, an ongoing study into the work of influential Scots.

He said: “After illness I became ­philosophical. I started to look at life in a slightly different way. I decided that the strength of the nation lies in its sense of community, the heart in its people and the soul in its history.

“Cicero said that not to know where you come from is to forever remain a child. Scotland needs to move on a wee bit and get a better sense of depth of its own history beyond Culloden and all that.

“We’ve lost sight of our history. We get caught up in stuff like Bonnie Prince Charlie, and yet there are these incredible stories about people like Muir, scientist James Clerk Maxwell, explorer David Livingstone, the list goes on and on.”

In 1903, Muir guided president ­Theodore Roosevelt through Yosemite, camping out for three nights during which Muir lobbied by the campfire, impressing upon him the need to set aside key areas for preservation and appreciation by future generations.


A natural rock arch in the Alabama Hills beside Lone Pine in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, John Muir’s ‘Range of Light’ in California.

 It worked. Roosevelt instigated five national parks in office. There are now 58.

Muir’s profile in Scotland has been bolstered in recent years, principally with the 2014 inception of the John Muir Way, a 130-mile east-west walk from Dunbar to Helensburgh, echoing a 211-mile trail named for the Scot through the American Sierra Nevada.

Schoolchildren also take part in the John Muir Award, an environmental education scheme encouraging young people to forge an appreciation of nature.

Ricky Ross weighed in on the legacy of the man described by ­Statesiders as a “wilderness prophet”, writing the tune For John Muir as a tribute on Deacon Blue’s 2014 album A New House.


The Bristlecone Pine can live for 3000 years making it one of the longest living organisms on the planet. Situated on one side of the Owens valley in California the Inyo mountain range have several sites of bristlecone forests.

 Ken said: “All of America’s national park system came out of this determination by Roosevelt to preserve America’s wild places for future generations.

“John Muir had a very strong belief that by going outdoors, you actually went into something. He was quite spiritual, he referred to nature as God’s cathedral.”

Read more at http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/honouring-scots-king-wild-frontiers-7913745#297tBvPH6vAfwWZM.99

World Heritage Day in Scotland

April 18th marks annual World Heritage Day across the globe. This special day serves to raise public awareness about the diversity of cultural heritage around the world, and the efforts that go into preserving this heritage.

Each year has a different theme, and the theme of World Heritage Day 2016 is “The Heritage of Sport,” to signify the upcoming Olympics in Brazil. You can find out more about World Heritage Day on the International Council of Monuments and Sites website.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation‘ recognizes World Heritage Sites as international locations of significant cultural or natural heritage which should be celebrated and preserved for generations to come. Scotland currently has six World Heritage Sites on the World Heritage List. Although World Heritage Day exists to celebrate all cultural sites and monuments, World Heritage Sites are especially honored.

Scotland’s six World Heritage Sites are as follows:

Image via westburnside.com

Image via westburnside.com

1. Forth Bridge 

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge that runs over the Firth of Forth. An iconic symbol of Scotland, the bridge was designed by English engineers Sir John Fowler and Sir Benjamin Baker. The bridge was opened on March 4th, 1890 by the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII.

Image via cyark.org

Image via cyark.org

2. Heart of Neolithic Orkney

The Heart of Neolithic Orkney is a group of surviving Neolithic monuments in Orkney, Scotland. The domestic and ritual monuments are not only amazing pieces of Neolithic design, but they also give us insights into the society and spiritual beliefs of the people who once inhabited Scotland.

Image via newlanarkhotel.co.uk

Image via newlanarkhotel.co.uk

3. New Lanark 

New Lanark is a restored 18th century cotton mill village found in the narrow gorge of the River Clyde. The village became famous for its success under the leadership of Welsh social reformer Robert Owen, who turned New Lanark into a thriving business village run through utopian socialism.

 

Image via theguardian.com

Image via theguardian.com

4. The Antonine Wall 

The Antonine Wall once marked the northernmost frontier barrier of the Roman Empire. Running across central Scotland, it was built by Roman soldiers under the direction of Emperor Antoninus Pius around AD 142. The builders commemorated the construction and their struggles with the Caledonians in decorative slabs along the site. Twenty of these slabs still survive.

Image via tripadvisor.co.uk

Image via tripadvisor.co.uk

5. The Old and New Towns of Edinburgh 

Together, the Old and New Towns of Edinburgh form what is arguably the one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The medieval structure of the Old Town gives Edinburgh its fairytale essence, the 18th century New Town is a beautifully preserved example of Georgian town planning and architecture.

Image via kildacruises.co.uk

Image via kildacruises.co.uk

6. St Kilda 

St Kilda is an is an isolated archipelago about 100 miles off of the west coast of Scotland. The group of remote islands is famous for hosting the largest colony of seabirds in all of Europe, as well as unique populations of sheep, field-mice and wrens. The human heritage of the islands includes various unique architectural features from the historic and prehistoric periods, as well as written records dating back to the Middle Ages.

Scotland’s six treasured historic sites were celebrated today with a day of free, fun activities at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh. The day brought the six World Heritage Sites to life with fun activities and informational presentations for the whole family.

Each of the six Scottish World Heritage Sites had its own stall to teach visitors more about the unique sites. Visitors were able to handle replica Neolithic and Roman artefacts, dress up as 19th century mill workers from New Lanark, and build their own Roman swords and St. Kilda Mailboats.

Find out more about celebrating World Heritage Day in Scotland here.

Have you #ScotSpirit?

VisitScotland, a partner of the American-Scottish Foundation, has launched a new tourism campaign aimed at promoting the “spirit of Scotland.”

Image via visitscotland.com

The campaign will celebrate the seven traits it believes can be found within the characters of the people and landscapes of the country: warmth, humour, guts, spark, soul, determination and fun.

The official hashtag of the movement, #ScotSpirit, is being used to unite and encourage people across the world in sharing what Scotland means to them.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon launched the campaign, along with stunt bike athlete and viral sensation Danny MacAskill, Social Bite entrepreneur, Josh Littlejohn and Olympic athlete, Laura Muir.

This is one of a series of initiatives changing the way in which VisitScotland markets Scotland around the world, the key markets being across the UK, France, Germany and New York City.

A new TV advert has been created, featuring time-lapse imagery directed by Edinburgh-based filmmaker Ben Craig, and a soundtrack composed by Giles Lamb and performed by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. In Scotland, the advert will feature a voiceover by Scottish actor and Game of Thrones star Iain Glen. In the USA, it will be narrated by Perthshire-born star of the US hit The Good Wife, Alan Cumming.

Image via visitscotland.com

Malcolm Roughead, chief executive of VisitScotland, said:

“The new advertising visuals are breathtaking and I’m sure they will inspire many to make the journey to Scotland, but this is about so much more than stunning imagery. It’s about harnessing a nation behind tourism.

Image via visitscotland.com

“We want everyone who cares for Scotland to get behind this campaign by using #ScotSpirit and in doing so become ambassadors for the country and create this very special movement.”

He added: “Scotland is a unique place inhabited by a unique people – a combination that creates an inimitable spirit.

“The emotional pull of this spirit can’t be duplicated by other destinations. You have to come to Scotland to experience it.”

Have you #ScotSpirit? Get involved by using the official #ScotSpirit hashtag and sharing what Scotland means to you.

All images via visitscotland.com.