Daily Archives: October 15, 2014

Alan Cumming’s Memoir Released

We are proud to announce that Alan Cumming, our 2009 New York Tartan Day Parade Grand Marshal and two-time Emmy award winner, has a new book that was just released on Tuesday, October 7: his memoir, Not My Father’s Son (Dey Street Books).

     Presented: The actor launched his book in New York on Monday night
Alan Cumming at his book release event in New York on Monday, October 6

Cumming is currently starring in the CBS television show The Good Wife, as well as the Roundabout Theatre’s production of Cabaret.

Though Cumming is known for his ability to expertly fuse humor into his roles, Not My Father’s Son reveals the darker and more traumatic side to his growing up experience. Navigating his troubling relationship with his father that grew darker and darker over the years with physical and verbal abuse, Cumming reflects on his growing up in rural Scotland and his relationships with other family members.

The Chicago Tribune calls Not My Father’s Son a clear-eyed, often moving account of both [Cumming’s] terrifying childhood and his recent attempts to come to terms with his past.”

To listen to an interview with Cumming on the Leonard Lopate Show on his new book, click here.


Cumming, 2009 Grand Marshall of the New York Tartan Day Parade

Don’t forget to register for the 2015 New York Tartan Day Parade! For any questions regarding registration, please email info@nyctartanweek.org.

Celtic Music, From Scotland to Appalachia

Fiona Ritchie, host of NPR’s The Thistle and Shamrock, and Doug Orr, president emeritus of Warren Wilson College, have teamed up to write a book that traces the movement of traditional Celtic music from Scotland to Appalachia.


Doc Watson, 1987

The book, Wayfaring Strangers (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), includes a CD of music by artists including Pete Seeger, Dolly Parton, and Doc Watson. Ritchie commented on the blend of natures possessed by Scottish music, saying: “It has that sort of soul to it that comes from Scottish music and Irish music and Appalachian.”  For more on Wayfaring Strangers, incuding an exerpt of the book, click here.