Tag Archives: Black Pudding

Making Scottish Fare in America: Full Scottish Breakfast

For ex-pats missing traditional Scottish fare, or for Americans wishing to give the cuisine a try, it can be difficult to recreate Scottish recipes with only American ingredients. But hae nae fear! The American-Scottish Foundation has written up a three- part guide to cooking up Scottish eats- even here in the USA.

Hungry for breakfast?

Image via visitscotland.com

Image via visitscotland.com

If you travel in Scotland, you’re likely to encounter a “Full Scottish Breakfast” somewhere along the way, whether at a cozy pub, a grand hotel or a tiny B & B.

The Scots’ classic “full” breakfast is sure to leave you feeling just that. Here is a guide to making your own.

 Full Scottish Breakfast

Juice- With or without pulp- or as the Scots say, “bits.”

A hot, strong pot of breakfast blend tea.

A small bowl of plain yogurt, with fruit and muesli toppings.  

A side of fresh fruit.

Oatcakes. These oat-crackers are a delicious breakfast treat, especially topped with a bit of jam. However, oatcakes can prove elusive in the USA. Worry not- oatcakes are surprisingly easy to bake yourself! Use this recipe from epicurious.com:

Image via recipeshubs.com

Image via recipeshubs.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into pieces
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk

Recipe:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 2 large baking sheets. Place oats in large bowl and sift flour, sugar, baking soda and salt in.
  2. Use your fingers to rub in shortening until the mixture is a coarse meal. Add buttermilk and stir into a dough.
  3. Transfer dough to floured surface and roll it out to 1/4-inch thickness. Using 2 1/2-inch round cookie cutter, cut out rounds, and arrange with space on the baking sheets. 
  4. Bake oatcakes until edges are pale golden (Around 12 minutes.) Let cool for 5 minutes. 

A selection of cereals. A Scottish favourite is Weetabix, which thankfully is widely available in US grocery stores today!

Image via evokekitchens.ie

Image via evokekitchens.ie

A steaming bowl of porridge. Rather than using instant quaker oats, cook your oats the old-fashioned way, on the stove with milk, butter, and sugar.

Plenty of fresh toast, cut up and buttered to perfection.

Half of a tomato, broiled.

A strip of bacon. In the UK, bacon is closer to a thin slice of ham, so substitute as you wish!

A “banger” or two. (Link sausages.)

A tattie scone. Scottish potato scones are not easy to come by in the US, so we recommend cooking up your own with this recipe from bbcgoodfood.com:

Image via domesticsluttery.com

Image via domesticsluttery.com

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound of Potatoes, peeled and cooked
  • 1/2 tsp spoon salt
  • 2oz butter
  • 4oz self raising flour

Recipe:

  1. Mash potatoes, mixing in the salt, butter and flour.
  2. Place on floured surface, knead lightly and roll out to a thickness of 1cm.
  3. Cut into triangles and cook on a hot, greased griddle for about 5 minutes on each side.
  4. Serve while they’re hot!

Sautéed mushrooms. Easily pan-fry with a bit of butter, salt and pepper.

Baked beans- From a can is fine!

One egg. Scrambled, poached, over-easy- that’s up to you!

And, finally, the famous black pudding. Black pudding is no sweet treat- it’s actually made of pigs’ blood, fat, oats, and spices. For those who want to try their hand at the savoury snack, here is a fairly simple recipe from epicurious.com:

Image via theguardian.com

Image via theguardian.com

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups fresh pig’s blood
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 cups steel-cut (pinhead) oatmeal
  • 2 cups finely diced pork fat (or beef suet), finely chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice

Recipe:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F and grease 2 glass loaf pans. (Metal will not work, unless well-lined with parchment.) Stir 1 teaspoon of salt into the blood.
  2. Boil 2 1/2 cups water and stir in the oats. Bring down to a simmer and stir occasionally for 15 minutes, until soft but not mushy.
  3. Pour the blood through a fine sieve into a large bowl, removing any lumps. Stir in the fat, onion, milk, pepper, allspice and remaining salt. Add the oatmeal and thoroughly mix. Divide the mixture into the pans, cover with foil, and bake for an hour, until firm. Let cool.
  4. To serve, cut a half-inch slice off the loaf and fry in butter or oil until the edges are slightly browned.

There you have it- a “Full Scottish Breakfast!” Aren’t you stuffed just thinking about it?